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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> let me finish with a behind the scenes look at what really happened at the great kennedy/nixon debates. you will love these stories i have dug up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> roun brown's in the national journal wrote the main reason oen is doing better in battleground zats has to do with his increase from white working women. keep in mind, back in 2008 nationally obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, hovers around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. lo
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
no more lies. no more apologies, no more coverups. richard nixon resigned because of lies and coverups. bill clinton was impeached for lies. where is the accountability in this administration? own up to the fact we are at war with an evil force that will never be satisfied until we are all dead. this is not about political offices or expanded geopolitical borders. this is about the survival of our civilization. if this administration won't lead in the battle, then step aside and let someone do it who won't lie to us and endanger our children. [ applause ] on friday the director of national intelligence issued a statement. joining me is katherine hair aj. why this document on friday afternoon? >> you know when you've got bad news the place you put it, that is when we had with the statement. this is a person who is top intelligence officer in the united states government. i have the statement right here. what i believe it does it attempts to give the administration some cover for their initial comments and then concludes what we saw in libya wasn't terrorism. there is a problem here. whe
nixon the first person i turned to was cindy quinn who -- i was 20 at the time when i took over the library. sandy was 30. we have grown up together around the library. it's a wonderful to be back. i'm glad you mentioned my friend his book will be a tremendous best seller. so if you have a chance come back. he is in fact performing in memphis the weekend after next. he has a great role in memphis which will be at the pantages. a brilliant and wonderful speaker. come out to hear him. we've been friends since we were too. rao the city to the other radio in los angeles. like to point out that we're all graduates of the university of michigan law school. different years. larry is older than i am. and is a little bit younger, but the three of us all graduated from law school. now one of us has been invited back to campus to speak. go figure. three nationally syndicated talk show hosts with a lot of audience and none of us have been invited back. every five years i invited back to harvard to be the person that this town. that the chief of staff and director of the peace corps and comm
. i'd say no more lies, no more apologies, no more coverups. retched nixon lied because of coverups and bill clinton i am protested because of lies and coverups, where is the accountability in this administration, own up to the fact that we are at war with an evil force never be molified or satisfied until we're all dead. this is not about political offices or expanded geopolitical orders, this is about the survival of our civilization, if this administration can't or won't lead in the battle then step aside and let someone do it who won't lie to us and endanger our children. [applause] well, on friday, the office of the director of national intelligence issued a statement, attempting to put the matter to rest, going to washington is the chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge. why this document dump on a friday afternoon? >> well, you know, governor, as well as everyone else when you've got bad news, the place you put it is late on friday, what we had with the statement from director of national intelligence, a person who is a top intelligence officer in the united stat
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
between nixon and kennedy. >> that was a very -- >> the actual camera. >> love actually you come in to cbs news here in new york and we have art facts every where. they are all over this new set. >> it's a museum out there. >> i was thinking about it. that debate was an interesting one. it was like did you watch it or did you hear it? if you watched it -- >> had a very different perception. >> very different. >> shows how the candidates handle pressure. is this the way i want to see the demeanor of my leader and it's credited with putting kennedy to the white house that debate because nixon had a lead at the time. >> nixon would argue he had a lead all along. that's another story. he would say the election -- that's another story. three debates, of course, first one. a lot of people think this is the most important one. we'll talk about the big debate moments over the last elections. stick with us. you're watching cbs "this morning saturday" and we'll be back with a look at the debates and how you win and how you lose on the big night. >> i got some ideas on,000 win. >> really? >> i don't
with john f. kennedy facing vice-president nixon. the next debates were not until 1976. a commission was set up to run the debates. at town hall format was introduced in 1992, which will be the format for the second debate. -- a town hall format was introduced in 1992. that will take place october 16. the final debate returns to the moderator and candidates on october 22 at lynn university of florida. on the panel today to discuss going beyond winning and losing, and we will move from my immediate left, correspondent of the new york times, abc news and nbc news and participant in the first televised debate in 1960 in chicago. and the grower, washington post contributing writer. ndy grower " washington post" contributing writer. michael hogan. charles mack gokalain. catherine olsen, univ. of wisconsin milwaukee and director of the schools frederick program. thank you all for being with us today. we will begin the program today with a bit of advice for those of you here in the studio and those of you watching for following this on twitter. when we go to questions, there are two microphones and
democrat jay nixon is seeking his second term running against dave spencer also libertarian jim higgs and it's raised as lean democratic. september 21st this comes to us from kmiz-tv. it's about an hour. >> governor nixon. go ahead. >> it's a pleasure to see so many friends we have worked with for so many years one of the reasons i ran for the governor and the things i've done for the last four and a half years now, a lot of that goes back to the small town in missouri. i had an opportunity to see my mother and father actively involved in public service on the school board. my dad as the mayor and in the evenings when the phone would ring someone would call it a problem. i would often be the one that would head back to the kitchen table and plead the case of that person. what i saw with my mom and dad was a focus on making sure they help solve those problems in a positive way. they didn't ask whether the question can democrat or republican or from someone who supported him or not. they said what can we do to move our city, our area for word, and that is what i have done as your govern
1972. the raging unpopular war in vietnam consumed the bitter campaign battle between president nixon and george mcgovern. suddenly on october 26th, 12 days before the election, vietnam negotiator henry kissinger made a surprise declaration believed to cement nixon's front-runner status. >> we believe that peace is at hand. >> reporter: it was the first so-called october surprise. a late in the game campaign event with a significant impact on the election. >> in order to win re-election for nixon in 1972, he needed to end the vietnam war. and this was sort of the definetive statement. >> reporter: the most famous october surprise was in 1980. 52 u.s. hostages held in iran were not released before the election despite president carter's efforts. instead they were freed as soon as rsh was inaugurated setting off democratic suspicion never proven that reagan elm sears back chanld with iran in delaying freeing the hostages and denied the troubled carter campaign a huge pre-election boost. >> it fed into the whole dynamic of the 1980 race in that jimmy carter was a stumbling ineffective pr
this is exactly what richard nixon said in his debate with jack kennedy. i share jack kennedy's mission. i share his concerns. we have the same goals. people at home are cringing, why am i giving him money, why am i voting for a guy who has the same goals as another guy. cynthia, you will probably not remember the nixon/kennedy debates, but you don't say the other guy is a good, compassionate guy and he cares about people. i do, too! that's what he's saying. i'm just like him. if you believe he's compassionate, i am too! he's selling obama. >> you say that if you don't have anything else to say, chris. another thing the bloomberg poll shows is that voters -- more voters believe that barack obama has a concrete plan for helping the middle class than believe that mitt romney has such a plan. that's another problem mitt romney has. he had expected that the economy would win the election for him. all he would have to do is go to people and say, i'm not barack obama. i can do a better job. in fact, he needed to do a lot more. obama has laid out specific proposals. he's had a job for months now, but m
tuned in to watch senator john kerry -- kennedy, excuse me and vice president richard nixon face off in thestl vafted presidentipre-- televised presidential debate. you know the story. the tanned john f. kennedy and then richard nixon. >>> as w rorted thekeye ate batones today. both mitt romney and president obama in that crucial battleground state. here's romney moments ago ins we terville, ohio, where he wrapped up an event with golfing legend jack nicklaus. >> after the debates and the campaigns and all the ads are overepl in ohio are going to say loud and clear on november 6th, we can't do four more years. we must do better. good morning, all. >> good morning, chuck. >> let's start where where things stand in ohio. we have a whole bunch of polls. saw new york times, quinnipiac polls. they show giant leads, eye-popping if you wi. the esidt teoi u , points up in florida, 12 in pennsylvania. i don't know why they have pennsylvania. i think we've all moved it off e battleground. susan page, cat leads but we can't debate who's leading. >> in ohio it seems clear that this is a state t
a cool handsome jack kennedy buried the nervous vice president richard nixon who turned down makeup and sweated uncontrollably. and nixon's image as a loser was driven home by questions like this. >> president eisenhower's asked to give one example of a major idea of yours that he adopted. his reply was, and i'm quoting, if you give me a week, i might think of one, i don't remember. >> i would suggest that if you know the president, that was probably a facetious remark. president president has asked for my advice. i have given it. sometimes my advice has been taken. sometimes it has not. chris: the second time a debate turned things around was ronald reagan's direct appeal to voters in his first and only faceoff with president jimmy carter. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was four years ago? do you feel that our security is as safe? that we're as strong as we were four years ago? chris: after that, the next day's "new york times" told the story of how critical that became. the are you better off ques
is just three days away. not the first debate ever. the first was 1960 with kennedy/nixon. mitt romney and barack obama will be live from denver. it is serious business, but there are also two games being played here. there's the expectations game the two campaigns have been playing. then there's the game of dodge ball. that's what we're talking about this morning. joining me now live is todd rogers. he's an assistant professor at harvard's kennedy school. thank you very much for joining us. >> hi, gary. thanks for having me. >> the artful dodge. what is that all about? >> so with a collaborator here at harvard, we've been doing psychological experiments to understand how its they politicians manage to evade questions without being detected so we've run a series of these experiments where viewers are randomly assigned to one of three conditions. in one condition they watch a video where a moderator asks a question that say as what will you do about the universal health care problem in the world. the politician said, i'll glad you asked me that. we need universal health care. we then sp
entertainment tv extravaganzas. they have since the 1960 kennedy/nixon debate. it became a televised event. richard nixon won if you listened on radio, but if you saw the body language on tv, it was kennedy who won. there was a period of time there were no presidential debates. 1964, '68, '72, none. but back in 1976 these debates came on again. they can be game changers. 1980, ronald reagan was where romney was, behind in the polls. reagan came on and took on an incumbent president, jim cia why ther, performed well in the debates and the rest is history. it started him on his way to a landslide victory in 1980. >> do you think debates actually help voters decide which person to back if they're on the fence as to which direction to go? >> i think they make a difference, particularly for mitt romney. look, barack obama, whether you love him or dislike him, think he's a great leader or think he's failed, we kind of know what he's going to be like as president. we've had him for 3 1/2 years. mitt romney is still an open book. people have to say, do i want to live with this guy every day? is he
said about dick nixon, i feel sorry for the guy because he doesn't know which dick nixon to be on any particular day. he wants the support of the tea party crowd. he needs them, john and mark, but he would never be a tea party person. he wouldn't show up at a yahoo kindf politics we don't like government. he's not been a life long foreign policy hawk, b he nts e suort heeoco community out there. he wants people who are hawkish. he's not a member ofhe religious right. he doesn't run around liberty university or hang around with jerry falwell, but he wants their support. he's not really a ryan republican ideologue conction politici, buhe p himn thck isn't that the fundamental problem with the guy? he wants to date these people through the election. he wants their support, but he doesn't want to be one of them. he doesn't want to marry them. is that true? >> yes. look, chris, thi he'a person who is fundamentally ill suited to being the republican nominee given what the republican party currently is. and you could say that on a bunch of different levels. it's an evangelical party and it's
? the answer 1960 and the famous kennedy-nixon debate. there won't be another one until gerald ford and jimmy carter until 1976. the first presidential debate coming up wednesday. as always, both sides playing the expectations game. tamping down a little bit. let me bring back maria cardona and amy holmes. amy, as you see it, who's got the advantage, president obama who's done so many, or mitt romney who frankly had to do it just to get the nomination? >> exactly. well, the president obviously has the incumbent advantage and he's been president the last four years and dealt with these issues on the front lines at 1600 pennsylvania avenue. as you mentioned, mitt romney as the gop nominee, he had to go through quite a gauntlet. i'm not sure that one person has the edge over the other. i think the question will be, you know, who gets off the best line and who's able to address the voters' concerns most directly and most pervasively. >> maria, same question. who do you think has the edge? a lot of people have been saying, mitt, where are the details? who do you think that is advantage right now?
these other people were squabbling amongst each other. the famous case of john kennedy and richard nixon. even reagan and carter in 1980. the confidence and ease that ronald reagan projected and jimmy carter looked a little bit defensive. that's the impression that lasts. >> even al gore and george w. bush i think is a good example of body language told so much during those debates. al gore was up in the polls and had a series of very poor debate performances. >> al gore had been a very effective, aggressive debater. in the first debate, he was seen as being too aggressive. the famous sighs and all the rest. in the second debate, he was almost too laid back. by the third he had a kind of just right approach, but by that time, those performances and all the other factors in the 2011 election held him back. >> how important is humor? >> it can be very important, but it's something that has to -- i guess some humorous lines probably are prescripted. there you go again by reagan most people feel w prepared. that, of course, is the magic. >> remember what lloyd benson said about dan quayle and pres
that first debate john kennedy on the stage with richard nixon and he was considered the winner of that on tv, not on radio, but that's where people were watching and then i think in 1976 in terms of a major gaffe when gerald ford who the president, hadn't been elected, richard nixon resigned, said that there was no domination by the soviet union of eastern europe. those are the two highlights, but that's a very rare occasion where a debate actually determines an election. >> let me ask you about this. both candidates seem to be praising each other lowering debate expectations. we're hearing mitt romney has been rehearsing zingers. the president has been rehearsing delivering shorter answers in this debate. what does each man need to do to convince the american public he's the right man for the job. let's start with president obama. >> president obama needs to just look presidential, not look flustered, not give any lines like hillary, you're likeable enough which seemed to demonstrate a certain arrogance or smugness or putting down anybody else. mitt romney has to be aggressive and has to ma
president richard nixon who is known to be a fierce debater. on screen kennedy looks cool and calm. while nixon looks uncomfortable, sweating profusely under the hot studio lights. >> think i better shave. >> reporter: nixon flounders. kennedy goes on to win the election. in 1976, president gerald ford makes this blunder in the debate with carter. >> will is not soviet domination of eastern europe and there never will be under a ford administration. >> i'm sorry. could i just -- >> reporter: the remark becomes a central theme in carter's campaign and blamed by many costing ford the emphasis. ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president carter for his stance on health care. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, began his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> reporter: reagan wins fans and the election by staying cool. >> there you go again. >> reporter: four years later president reagan again uses humor to handle attacks on his age during his debate with walter mondale. >> i want to you know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am n
. which leads to lesson three -- appearances count, above all. jfk. tan. nixon? just out of the hospital, pale and refusing professional makeup. lighting counts, too. in 1984, reagan's people fussed more over his, man mondale's did over his. and reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get the rosy cheeks. lesson four. real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here, so, relax. learn your lines and don't speak in a look at your wristwatch because that will definitely hurt you. besides, 90 minutes and you're done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> and we're so glad you were watching. you may have noticed some differences here in our studio. let us hear from you at abcnews.com. and, of course, "nightline" will be along later. as we leave you tonight, with a look at the white house, aglow in pink in honor of breast cancer awareness month. we'll see you again tomorrow. until then, good night. >>> next at 6:00 disbelief in a albany school. the death of a teacher at the center of a student sex scandal. also. >> i am not now intimidated
count above all. jfk, tan. nixon, just out of the hospital, pale, refusing professional makeup. reagan's people fussed more over his than mondale's did over his. reagan always had a glass of wine just before going on to get those rosy cheeks. lesson four, real debating? so far, after 52 years, not actually required here. so relax. learn your lines. don't sneak in a look at your wristwatch. because that will definitely hurt you. beside, 90 minutes and you are done. possibly for good. john donvan, abc news, washington. >> possibly for good. nice line there. >> that's how rob gets his cheeks nice and takes it from the old gipper. it works. i think there's so much choreography that goes behind the debates. iasciwhat made-for-tv evehey first started with nixon and kennedy. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- getting ready for the duel in denver. >> we'll see how both candidates are preparing for the first presidential debate coming up tomorrow night. it is tuesday, october 2nd. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> good to
presidential campaigns since 1968. and humphrey and nixon. so i've been watching debates throughout the years, and it's my super bowl. i mean, i get all excited. i'm so thrilled that the debate is tomorrow, i can hardly wait. so i have observed many of the debates, not just based on my experience, but there is always something, people, after i did the debate, would come and tell me that they were concerned about things that the candidates did. >> like what? >> not what they said. >> like looking at a watch? >> like george bush looking at his watch, and standing near his stool the entire debate. and bill clinton wading right up to the audience questioners showing his compassion and feeling for these people. and it jumped through the screen. and i've had people -- i've had people, you know, these days, telling me, i want to see how they do. it is not -- i want it hear what they have to say about how to solve the economy. they want to see how they do. and i think a lot of things -- the conventional wisdom is that all the debates do is reinforce your ideas about a candidate that you support, or d
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)